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Spotlight Winner: Michigan State University (United States)

Katie Compo, Zihao Gao and Dakshaini (Daki) Ravinder, pictured with their professor Young Anna Argyris, from Michigan State University. From the team: “We combined our interests in analytics, social media and nonprofits to take up the challenge. Our team brought in fresh perspectives and experience from our jobs and course work to help the client set realistic, achievable and measurable goals, and we went the extra mile to help strategize a plan the client could follow even after the challenge ended.”

Professor Increases HPV Vaccination Rates for Underserved Populations

Young Anna Argyris, Ph.D., assistant professor of Media and Information, has been selected as the 2019 recipient of the Diversity Research Network Program Launch Awards Program (DRN-LAP) for researching the influence of these messages on mothers deciding whether or not to vaccinate their children. 

Faculty Feature of the Month by Health & Risk Communication Center

Dr. Young Anna Argyris, Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Information, is this month's feature of HRCC. Her research focuses on the organizational use of social media to connect disparate parties, using information technology as a decision-making aid. She also focuses on health misinformation and social media influences.

 

#1. Spotlight Winner: Michigan State University (United States)

Katie Compo, Zihao Gao and Dakshaini (Daki) Ravinder, pictured with their professor Young Anna Argyris, from Michigan State University. From the team: “We combined our interests in analytics, social media and nonprofits to take up the challenge. Our team brought in fresh perspectives and experience from our jobs and course work to help the client set realistic, achievable and measurable goals, and we went the extra mile to help strategize a plan the client could follow even after the challenge ended.”

What was your favorite part of OMC?

 

The freedom to experiment with ads in a safe environment coupled with the opportunity to work directly with a non-profit partner to improve their marketing efforts. We not only learned valuable marketing skills, but we were a part of teaching our non-profit partner to carry forth our digital marketing plans once our time together came to a close.

What lessons did you take from your experience?

 

The top three things that we learned were:

  • 1. How Google Ads works

  • 2. Specific keywords work better than general keywords

  • 3. The importance of having a user-friendly website

What do you plan to do next with your digital marketing skills?

 

All three of us plan to use our marketing skills in our careers. Katie plans to use her skills to market her photography business, Daki has been using these skills in her job as a Marketing Communications Specialist in higher education, and Zihao plans to use his skills to join a professional sport team’s marketing department.

What advice would you give to other students starting OMC?

Don’t be afraid to stop or adjust an ad set that isn’t performing well. You learn through experimentation and making constant improvements to your ads. Compare, contrast and track your changes so you can take away lessons about what performs most effectively.

 

#2. Professor Increases HPV Vaccination Rates for Underserved Populations

 

Social media is a realm of free speech and differing opinions. A group of social media users are using this platform to discuss what they believe to be the potential dangers of vaccinating children for HPV (human papillomavirus ), the most common sexually transmitted infection.

Young Anna Argyris, Ph.D., assistant professor of Media and Information, has been selected as the 2019 recipient of the Diversity Research Network Program Launch Awards Program (DRN-LAP) for researching the influence of these messages on mothers deciding whether or not to vaccinate their children. 

Assistant Professor Young Anna Argyris, 2019 Diversity Research Network Program Launch Awards Program Recipient, Investigates Anti-Vaxx Social Media Messaging Phenomenon

Social Media and Influence

 

The goal, Argyris said, of her research is to improve HPV vaccination rates among marginalized women. While the professor is one of communication and not of medicine, she saw a niche she could fill in helping to improve these rates. In fact, Argyris’ original research pertained to fake news and misinformation. What she found was that health misinformation had a big impact on our lives.

“The virus is one of the major causes of death, especially among underserved women. It’s definitely an important issue,” said Argyris. “We’ve noticed that anti-vaccination messages play a significant role in suppressing the vaccination behaviors among these groups of women.”

By crawling Instagram and Twitter with a team of students, the researcher noticed those in favor of anti-vaccination used different techniques on platforms to increase vaccine hesitancy among underserved populations. 

A survey was also used to find that mothers’ interactions with the propaganda and influencers negatively influenced their opinions of immunizing their children. More than 90% of decisions made related to vaccinating children were made by mothers, in accordance to the team’s findings. She also stated that more than 90% of US mothers of adolescents are on Facebook or social media accounts. This allows them to be exposed to this messaging.

“They even trust these influencers more than their own doctors. How these influencers talk about these vaccines will influence important decisions on whether these mothers vaccinate their children or not,” said Argyris. 

Social Media and Influence

 

For her research, Argyris received $4980 from DRN-LAP in order to help support her in making any strides she needs to succeed.  The award, given by the Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives, is “intended to aid scholars in launching new research through pilot study, creative projects of scholarly merit or the enhancement of a measure or technique.” 

Arygyris stated that she would be using the funds to help further this line of research and continue looking into this anti-vaccination social media wave. Plans for the future also include laying groundwork for a program that can filter out misinformation and push down anti-vaccination propaganda and spam.

 

#3. Faculty Feature of the Month by Health & Risk Communication Center

Our November Faculty Feature of the Month is Dr. Young Anna Argyris. A professor in the Department of Media and Information since 2014, Dr. Argyris’s research focuses on the use of social media to facilitate individual and collective decision-making processes through creating the viral dissemination of content to and exerting social influence on the audiences. Most recently, this work has centered on visual congruence-induced social influence on social media sites for exchanging multimodal content, and the dissemination of health misinformation and its impact on preventive behaviors. To conduct these studies, Dr. Argyris applies a blend of self-reported methods (population-based surveys and in-vivo experiments), large-scale longitudinal data collection and analyses, and machine-learning based automatic classifications.

Dr. Argyris holds her PhD in Management Information Systems from the Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia. Prior to coming to MSU, she was an assistant professor at the Gabelli School of Business, Fordham University and a visiting scholar at Carroll School of Management, Boston College.

Dr. Young Anna Argyris, Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Information, is this month's feature of HRCC. Her research focuses on the organizational use of social media to connect disparate parties, using information technology as a decision-making aid.

Her Recent Publications:

 

  • Argyris, Y. A., Muqaddam, A. and Miller, S. (2020) "The Effects of the Visual Presentation of an Influencer’s Extroversion on Perceived Credibility and Purchase Intentions—Moderated by Personality Matching with the Audience," Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services.

  • Argyris, Y. A., Wang, Z., Kim, Y., & Yin, Z. (2020). The effects of visual congruence on increasing consumers’ brand engagement: An empirical investigation of influencer marketing on instagram using deep-learning algorithms for automatic image classification. Computers in Human Behavior, doi:10.1016/j.chb.2020.106443

  • Argyris, Y. A., Wang, Y. and Muqaddam, A. (2020) "Role of Culture in Engaging Consumers in Organizational Social Media Posts," Journal of Organizational Computing and Electronic Commerce, doi:10.1080/10919392.2020.1823177.

  • Argyris, Y. A., Muqaddam, A. and Liang, Y. (2019) “The Role of Flow in Dissemination of Recommendations for Hedonic Products in User-Generated Review Websites,” International Journal of Human Computer Interaction. DOI: 10.1080/10447318.2019.1631543

  • Yim, D., Khuntia, J., & Argyris, Y. A. (2018). User Behaviors and Knowledge Exchange in Health Infomediary. In Handbook of Research on Emerging Perspectives on Healthcare Information Systems and Informatics (pp. 213-233). IGI Global.

  • Wang, Z., Yin, Z. and Argyris, Y. A. "Detecting Medical Misinformation on Social Media Using Multimodal Deep Learning,” is accepted to the IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics, https://doi.org/10.1109/JBHI.2020.3037027 (Impact factor >5).

This study centers on the development of a deep learning-based multimodal detector for Instagram anti-vaccine messages (images, texts, and hashtags). To evaluate the proposed model’s performance, a real-world social media dataset that consists of more than 30,000 samples was collected from Instagram between January 2016 and October 2019. Our 30 experiment results demonstrate that the final network achieves above 97% testing accuracy and outperforms other relevant models, demonstrating that it can detect a large amount of antivaccine messages posted daily on social media.

 
CONTACT ME

Young Anna Argyris

 

Email: argyris@msu.edu

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